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A Jar of Eyes

So the US is currently stuck living out an ongoing dumpster fire. As such, I have been looking for magix and spells that could be performed that would help to bolster the actions of protestors across the country and limit the actions of those who seek to harm others. I was recently shown a curse jar that I’ve seen float around tumblr regularly, and it was suggested that it could be used to limit the harm that certain government office could inflict upon the people of the world. The curse jar really stuck out to me and I decided to give it a shot. I’m documenting what I’ve done here, so that others can join in if they’d like.

So you can find the basic premise for this jar here, but as I said, I’ve modified things a little bit. The basics of the jar stayed the same.

I kept the googly eyes on the inside, but decided to pick a package of differently designed eyes. I felt that this would help to emphasize the diversity of our country, and help to reinforce that different groups of people from all over would be participating in watching our government and keeping them in check. That way, one community or group of people wouldn’t be held responsible for what is technically the responsibility of all of us. For gluing the eyes on the interior of my jar (which I used a plastic Talenti gelato container), I found that it was easiest to slather the glue all over a section of the side of the jar, and then place eyes on in whatever configuration seemed to fit best.

eyes

jar1

I swapped out the poppet for a paper dodecahedron and included different seals from various governmental branches on it as a means of limiting their ability to inflict harm. If you’d like to use my template, you can try and use this image:

dodecahedronAfter cutting the dodecahedron out, I opted to place sigils on the inside, further binding the groups from harming people. Because my paper dodecahedron is hollow, I decided to fill it with things to help make the people causing harm uncomfortable. I created a mixture of salt, chili powder, creole seasoning powder, and mace; and poured it inside and shook it around.

herdonopen

I then placed it on a paper stand (read: tube) so that it would be kept fairly central in comparison to the eyes. I wanted to make sure that they were front and center where everyone can see them.

hedronstand

For the words used while putting everything together, I used an altered version of the original that felt a bit more in alignment with what I was trying to achieve:

You cannot touch the marginalized people in our country.
You cannot hurt the marginalized people in our country.
Think of them and bring this curse upon you.
May your tongue catch in your throat if you dare to hurt the marginalized people in our country.
May you burn and ache if you come near.
May you feel eyes upon your back each time you think hurting anyone.
They’re watching. I’m watching. We’re all watching.
May you forever question the gaze of others –
Do they know the things you’ve done?
I do. I curse you. I bind you.
You cannot touch anyone.

And this is what it looks like with everything in place

jar

If you decide to do a version of this for yourself, please let me know as I’d love to see it. And a big thank you to catthekitchenwitch on tumblr for coming up with the original idea, which gave me the springboard to come up with this.

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Posted by on February 7, 2017 in Devo Magix Series

 

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Devo Magix: Spoon Heka

Ever since I learned about Spoon Theory, I have had a thing for spoons. I think this is because it gave me an image to latch on to that represented so much of what I was going through, and in the process, I have collected quite a number of spoons.

spoons1

Most of these spoons sit in a special cup on my personal shrine at home. Because there is no discreet or easy way to carry spoons with me, I am forced to leave my spoons at home in their cup and go on with my day without them. It has always been my hope that I could find spoons that I could hang on a necklace, or put on a key chain or spoons that would be small enough to carry on my person. It just so happens that I finally found some.

My partner found a set of teapot spoons online, and decided to get them for me on a whim. They suit me in a lot of ways- I love tea and the rhinestone on the handle is really up my alley. And the best part about these spoons is that they are small and have a loop in the handle, which can be strung up on a necklace.

My original intent was to get some thin satin cording, however my attempts at finding a color that suited my needs was proving difficult. I could find a ton of rainbow colors, as well as a bunch of really boring, washed out colors. But there wasn’t anything that really worked for me.

In my despair, I meandered around the Micheal’s and tried find something else that would work for my needs. I came across this really nice “yarn” that I felt I could use. And I was in luck because it was on sale, and there were two sets of colors that suited the gods I worked with- the red reminding me of Set, and the blue cording reminded me waaaay too much of the River and Big O. I felt like it was a win-win for me all around.

spoons

So I sat down with all of my supplies and decided what to do with the spoons. Due to the thickness of the cording, I could no longer string beads onto the necklace like I had originally hoped. However, I decided to play off of the netting that existed within this “yarn” and I worked with knots and numbers instead.

cording

For the red cord, I chose to place two knots above the spoon. Two was a number of duality in ancient Egypt, and I have come to associate two with not only creation, but balance. Harkening back to balancing my two halves and making them whole, I can no longer look at the number two and not think about this. The same way that Ptah balances chaos and stability, I balance my work with Set and Osiris, and I balance my internal self with my external life. Balance is incredibly important to me, and so I felt that having two knots suited this need well.

spoons-2

The blue cording was a slightly different story, though. I decided to try and make a more complicated knot for this piece, which is perhaps a reflection on the complicated nature of mine and Osiris’ relationship. I opted to look online for something that would translate well into this thicker “yarn”, and I found this. And so I decided to give it a shot. After I created the more complicated knot, I added two smaller knots to either side of the main piece. The number 4 represented completeness and totality in ancient Egyptian symbolism, and I felt that I could use some completeness and stability in my self-care. This also mirrors Osiris himself, who is known to be the djed pillar- a beacon of stability and endurance.

spoon-CU

Although the necklaces probably look more home made than some people would prefer, I liked the informality of each of these pieces. I also like that I could take the spoons off of the current cording, and switch them out for something else. So if I decided that I wanted to change the focus of the cord, I could either untie them, and redo them in a more suitable format. Or, I could destroy the current cording, and replace it with entirely new cording that suits my needs. Either way, there is a lot of flexibility in what I could do with these pieces, and I like that.

spoons-3

I am super happy that I can finally take a spoon with me to work or to family gatherings or what have you. It feels nice to be able to look down and see the cording, or to rub the spoon between my fingers when I’m stressed and know that I am not alone. And because the cording ties back to my gods, it’s another way to have them in my day to day life in a not-so-obvious way. I can’t wait to be able to take these spoons with me, and see how they influence my ability to cope with day to day life, as well as how many learning opportunities they will provide when someone asks me “Why are you wearing a spoon?”.

Have you ever performed any spoon heka? If so, how did you go about it?

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KRT: Making Sense of Heka

How do you work with heka? How can you utilize heka more in your day to day life? Any tips for people trying to get started in using heka?

I think it can be difficult for people to figure out how to pursue heka as a practice. We know, in a way, about what it is. That it is speech and action brought together to create change. That it is about speaking effectively and implications that speech can have on the physical world around us. And it’s not too difficult to find examples heka from antiquity – Borghouts book has plenty of examples for reference, and if you’re able to get ahold of any source materials (CT, PT, etc) or books that have rituals based off of rituals from antiquity then it’s not too challenging to see how it was done back in the day.

But I think a lot of us struggle with figuring out how to create new heka, or how to bring it into daily life. Heka is such a vast, and yet intangible thing that it can be difficult to figure out how to do more with it.

Usually when I talk about how I create new stuff in regards to magix, I tell people that I pull it out of my ass. And this is largely true. I often make up stuff on the fly, and it’s very difficult for me to explain to people how they can make stuff up on the go, too. However, I think that my methods really boil down to a few questions/steps:

1. What am I trying to accomplish?

This is pretty self explanatory. What exactly do you want to achieve with your heka? What is the end result? Have you considered all of the caveats of what you’re wanting to have happen? When I mention caveats, I mean unforeseen results or pitfalls of working magix a certain way. A good example of this might be “I want to get rid of my coworker” without thinking about the caveat of “what if my coworker is replaced by an even worse coworker?” Figuring out a very specific end goal is, in my opinion, the best place to start when creating new magix or heka.

2. What supplies do I have on hand? What is the most direct method of achieving my goal?

When it comes to my practice, I usually rely on a few standard methods. I may use these methods in different ways for each working that I perform, but at the end of the day, I have a fair amount of standard things that I rely on for my workings. Typically, this will involve sigil work, edible magix, symbolism and heka-laden symbols from antiquity, destruction (such as execrations) and container magix. And then, of course, there is good old fashioned mundane aspects of my heka as well. These kinds of things could include talking with people, cleaning my house, being proactive with figuring out a practical solution to a situation, etc. I prefer to attack any situation from both sides because I feel that using both mundane and metaphysical tactics usually provides a more successful result.

Experimenting with methods until you have a few standard practices that work well for you is useful, in my experience. Knowing how well certain methods work for you can allow you to know where your strengths lie, as well as helping you to get a feel for how different practices and methods can be modified for new heka.

If you’re unsure what to use for methods, take a look at whatever you’re good at. If you’re good at drawing or painting- use that in your heka. If you’re good with sewing, there are many ways to weave magix into a sewing project. If you like to cook, it is very easy to weave heka into recipes. If you examine the stuff that you’re good at doing, you can almost always find a way to use it in heka practices. And when in doubt, take a look at how the Egyptians did things in the past, or how other modern practitioners make use of heka and magix now.

Because heka often utilizes words in order to make things happen, I often like to include statements that are said over an item, or statements that are written down and placed within an item. If you end up using this method, be sure to be careful about the words you use. Be strong in your statements. Us present tense when you write your statements out (“I am” as opposed to “I will be” or “I might be”). Be sure to be specific in the words that you use, and don’t be afraid to repeat things in different ways. The Egyptians often liked to repeat phrases 4 times for efficacy. So I often do as well.

3. Gather the supplies and do the thing.

That’s really all I do whenever I am trying to come up with ideas for heka. I look at what I’ve done in the past, look into what exactly I’m trying to achieve, and then I format something new. I know that the generalized format for this is probably not very helpful, so let’s pull together some examples for heka that might help to round out how I go about making stuff.

Example 1: How can I protect XYZ thing?

This is a pretty common request that I see around the community. Protecting stuff can be done in a wide variety of ways, and I usually rely on a couple of standbys whenever protection is needed.

First, I rely on symbolism that is already inherent in our religious structure. Sa amulets were often used for protection, as were Eyes of Horus/Ra and scarabs. Flipping through a basic Kemetic symbolism book should produce a number of protective symbols to use.

Then I decide how to charge the symbol, and how to affix it to whatever I am protecting. Charging can come in a number of ways- through words of power, incense, oils, or the gods themselves. If you’re wanting to ingest the protection, you could draw the symbol in frosting on a cake, or create it out of whatever on earth you’re eating (such as making an eye of Horus out of peas on your plate- it sounds hokey, but it is sound in theory). You could also draw the symbol on a piece of paper and affix the paper to whatever you’re trying to protect, or you could drop the paper in a cup of water for a few moments, and then drink the water (this was done in antiquity). All of these things would be helpful for protection, and we’ve only scratched the surface for ideas.

Another example that I can cite for protection that came up recently was using crocheting to create something that was protective. Thread work is something that I love to use in my practice, and if you were to charge the yarn that you are using, and then focus your intent through possibly chanting or listening to a song over and over again while you crocheted your protective item (such as a scarf or beanie), you’d end up with something that is fairly potent. You could make this even more potent by placing sigils or anointing your crochet hooks with protective oil, and then placing it in shrine for the gods to bless once it’s all done. Layers, in my experience, are useful for making the heka more potent.

Example 2: What can I use to help improve my health?

This is a wide topic to cover, and there are many specifics involved when it comes to improving or protecting one’s health. So for this example, I will stick with something that is fairly basic, and can hopefully be modified for other purposes. It’s important to understand that when it comes to dealing with health related issues, it’s almost imperative that you use multiple things to get well. Heka and magix alone will not fix it, and in cases that are more severe (such as chronic or terminal illness), you will have to make changes to your life in order to see results. You can’t expect heka to carry all of the weight.

The first thing to figure out is are you improving a particular illness? If so, is the illness a one-time shot, or something that is chronic? If it’s an illness that will run its course and then be gone, I find that practical things are the most important. Being sure to get plenty of rest, eating the foods that are proper for healing, and taking any medications that will help with healing are the most important aspects. You could, of course, utilize heka in your food preparation. You could place sigils on the cup you’re drinking your hot tea out of, or make a statement over your soup that “this will help nourish me and heal me” or things of that nature.

For chronic illness, I often like to create things that I can wear or bring with me wherever I go. Because my illnesses are hidden, I often like to use spoons for symbols for any heka that I work, but you could find other symbols (the imywt fetish comes to mind- as it would be a type of vessel for healing) that speak to you or work better for your own needs. You could create a small bracelet out of multiple strands of ribbon that you wear to help deal with your illness. You’d simply need to come up with a phrase that suits your needs (“I am whole. I am pure. I am healthy.” as an example) and chant that while you braid up the bracelet. And then if you wanted, you could add a charm to it that is also charged with oils, incense, words of power, etc. to help increase the heka. The Egyptians loved to use the number 4 for totality, so you could also add 4 beads to such a bracelet, or tie 4 large knots into it to help add more stability to the heka. And again, you could place this in shrine for the gods to bless, if you wanted.

Another possibility might be charging clothing with heka. Relying on colors or patterns to help bring life to the fabric in the way that a power suit or lucky tie might. You could write things on your hangers that help to charge the clothes, or you could write something onto a piece of fabric (such as “When I wear this, my illness will have no influence or sway over me. When I am in these clothes, I am invincible. My stance is strong and my grip is firm. Everything I see will be in my grasp.”) and then place it into a pocket or inside of the lining of whatever you’re wearing.

Or you could try placing heka onto your pillow, so that your sleep is more restful. You could create a small satchet with comforting scents inside of it, and perhaps a small amulet for protection and rest (I’d probably use a djed, myself). And again, placing a small statement inside that states that you are restful and at ease in bed, that by sleeping on this pillow, you’re going to get the most awesome sleep you’ve ever had, and that you’ll wake up refreshed.

Little things like this can help to bring heka into every aspect of your life. The more of it you can weave into your daily existence, the stronger it becomes.

These are, of course, very simple examples, and I’ve only scratched the surface with the many many ways you can approach them. Hopefully, though, it is a bit clearer to understand how I go about sorting through different methods that could be used to tackle any particular situation you might come up against.

How can I bring heka into my day to day life?

Many people want to know how to bring more heka into their day to day life, and the simplest way to do that is to be mindful of the words you use and the actions you take. Many times, we seem to restrict heka to a more ritualized sense, but the truth is all of our words have impact. Regardless of the context in which they are uttered, signed, or typed. We must always be mindful of the impact that our words can have, and one of the easiest ways to begin to understand this is to pay attention to how your words effect people, and how other people’s words effect you. As you begin to see the cause and effect that occurs with speech (and action as well), it becomes easier to figure out how to use words and actions to create change in your life and you become more effective at utilizing the right words the first time to cause the change that you want. As you learn to see these patterns in your mundane life, it becomes much simpler to figure out how to bring them into a more ritualized or magix setting.

Figuring out heka can take some trial and error, but it’s definitely worth working with. It has a lot of applications in both mundane and metaphysical situations, and being well spoken never goes out of style.

To read other responses to this topic, check out the KRT Master List

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Reconsidering the Witch’s Uniform

Alternate Title: Why cliched pointy hats and crooked noses have to go.

I would like to extend a special thank you to GLE and Warboar for educating me about this and providing resources to make this post possible.

Its normal for marginalized groups to try and reclaim things that have been used against them. You see this in countless cultures and subcultures such as the LGBTQ+ community reclaiming the word “queer” or pink triangles as a sign of pride, or using the term “tree hugger” by environmentalists, or the use of the word “bitch” by some women. This is not a new phenomenon by any means. It is something that is called reappropriation, and according to wikipedia it is:

the cultural process by which a group reclaims—re-appropriates—terms or artifacts that were previously used in a way disparaging of that group

And I think that this reappropriation has occurred within the Pagan/polytheist scene, too. We’re a relatively marginalized group within the US culture and there have been attempts to carve out an acceptable and respectable space for ourselves. Even use of the term “Pagan” is reappropriative, as the term “pagan” wasn’t always used with happy connotations.

In addition to reappropriating the word Pagan, I believe that many of us have tried to reappropriate what a witch looks like. In most modern media, witches aren’t represented in a great light. I mean, look at the Wizard of Oz. The Wicked Witch of the West is rendered as the villain and shown with green skin and less than ideal facial features. You’ve got Witchhazel in Donald Duck’s Trick or Treat, who doesn’t look much better. There is the witch in Snow White and Ursula is called a Sea Witch in the Little Mermaid.

witches

Each of these women have something in common- they are rendered as ugly, evil, wearing dark clothing, and in most cases- they are wearing the standardized “witch’s uniform” of dark robes, pointed hats, and hooked noses (with warts!). You know the one:

I think many of us in the pagan and witchcraft communities see these images, and want to try and recraft the standard “witch” into something that is accepted- warts and all. However, the problem with reappropriating this imagery is that it’s not ours to reappropriate.

These stereotypical images of what a witch looks like are not based off of modern Pagans, or even off of witches in antiquity. These images are largely based off of anti-Semitic propaganda from the Middle Ages that has persisted into the modern era. Because these images are not tied to pagan “culture” or witches (past and present), we really have no place touching them or reappropriating them into our modern Pagan culture. Because they don’t belong to us, when you dress up like this (or dress your kids up like this) you are, in fact, perpetuating anti-Semitism.

To give some perspective on this, Pagans trying to reclaim the witch’s getup would be the same as non-LGBTQ+ people trying to reappropriate the pink triangles mentioned above. These triangles do not play a role in their history, and they have no claim on the symbol, and therefore, no right in trying to reappropriate it. Same goes for modern Pagans and the witch’s uniform.

The History of the “Witch’s Uniform”

Please note: the sheer volume of information on how anti-Semitism got its start in the Medieval era is way more than I can cover in one blog post, so consider this a very very short walk through on some of the major points of history during this time. If you are interested in learning more, please check out the links below.

It can be difficult to track down exactly how or where the standard “iconic” witch came from. Based off of what I have seen, it appears as though things shifted gradually over time, and many small pieces added up together to make the standardized “iconic witch” mentioned above. To start piecing how all of this happened, you have to go back to the 1200’s to see when some of the first changes were enacted.

One of the initial things that the Jewish people underwent in Europe was the wearing of special garments to denote that they were, in fact, Jews. There were badges, belts, and hats that were implemented over the course of history. These hats became the basis for the witches hat that we all know today:

According to Robert Wistrich:

In fact, the literal understanding of horns in the Psalter inspired the horned hat (pileum cornutum) that Jews were forced to wear from the thirteenth century on. It too began to appear in art in the ninth century and is visually derived from late versions of the Magi’s hats and from the Phrygian caps worn be deniers of Christ in the Stuttgart Psalter. These hats vary in form but have one thing in common: a single point or hump which simultaneously covers and calls attention to the horn the Jew was believed to have. That these hats denote an identification with the devil is shown in thirteenth century illuminations in which there is no clear differentiation between a demon’s single horn and pointed hats. By revealing the horn the Jews skillfully hide, these pointed hats acted as a mark of Cain. (pg 55-56)

As well as:

While continuing their role as Christ’s torturers and deniers, from the thirteenth century on they also appear – identified by the Jew’s hat – as Apocalyptic riders, false prophets, worshipers of Antichrist, and companions of the heretics in Hell. In such works, Antichrist, demons, apocalyptic killers, heretics, and Jews often have hooked noses. This originally demonic feature became associated specifically with Jews by the thirteenth century, and has remained an accepted stereotype to this day. (pg 53)

During this time frame, there were many changes made to art and other religious iconography that were made to demonize and dehumanize Jewish people. This included adding horns to Jewish Biblical figures such as Moses and David.

Many of these dehumanizing actions came to a head during the Inquisition during the 1600’s and 1700’s. According to an excerpt from Stephen Haliczer:

During the fourteenth century, with the breakdown of the old toleration that had permitted Christian, Jew, and Moslem to live side by side in relative harmony, the Jew became more and more identified as the chief enemy of Christianity. By the time of the Cortes of Toro in 1371, the Jews were described as “rash and evil men, who sow corruption with impunity so that the greater part of our kingdom is ruined by them in contempt of Christians and the Catholic faith.”[5] […]

By the 1380s the weakened condition of the Jewish communities and the relativistic philosophy then popular among Jewish intellectuals were producing numerous conversions.[6] After the rioting of 1391, Jews converted en masse, led by their rabbis, and from then on Spain’s Jewish communities became smaller and more impoverished while the converted Jews grew in numbers, wealth, and political importance. By the middle of the fifteenth century, however, resentment of the conversos was giving rise to a polemical literature that rejected the possibility of their true conversion to Christianity and blamed them for all the crimes normally attributed to Jews. The most interesting and important of these writings was the Fortalitium Fidei (Fortress of the Faith) by the Franciscan Alonso de Espina, first published in 1460. The work is divided into four volumes, each dedicated to describing the iniquity of one of the four chief enemies of the Catholic faith: heretics, Muslims, Jews, and demons. For Espina, Jews and converts did not exist as a separate category; there were only “public Jews and secret Jews.” Since conversos were secret Jews, they were naturally guilty of all the offenses traditionally attributed to Jews by European folk tradition, including profanation of Hosts and the murder of Christian children and the use of their blood or body parts in religious rituals. According to Espina, Jewish law, which is equally binding on both Jews and converts, commands the destruction of Christians and Christianity, which they actively strive to accomplish by starting fires, poisoning wells, and doing other evil deeds.[7]

It was left to the Spanish Inquisition, however, to officialize medieval demonological myths about Jews and apply them to Jewish converts to Christianity in such a way as to keep alive the flames of Spanish anti-Semitism long after the expulsion of the Jews themselves. This process began with the case of the so-called Holy Child (Santo Niño) of La Guardia when both Jews and converts were accused of working together to commit a crime of unimaginable horror which threatened the very existence of Christian Spain. So successful were the inquisitors in this that the La Guardia case served to create in the public imagination a kind of bogyman, a larger-than-life image of the Jew/converso who was at once child murderer, blood sucker, rebel, and demonic sorcerer who sought to reverse the divinely established order of things by destroying Christianity so that, according to Licenciado Vegas, the Holy Child’s first chronicler, the Jews “would become the absolute lords of the earth.”[8]

Just by examining these few texts alone, it is easy to see how everything comes together. The Jews were forced to wear different clothing, which mirrors the typical “witches clothing” that we envision now. The hooked nose became synonymous with Jewish people, and was utilized as a means to demean Jewish people. And the Jews were often cited as stealing and killing children, as well as poisoning people and performing witchcraft, which likely explains the green skin witches are “attested” to have.

All of these symbolic items were meant to demonize Jews, and they have persisted into the modern era, albeit detached (to an extent) from the original meaning behind these symbols.

What does this mean for Pagans?

There are plenty of posts out there that talk about eradicating things like racism, ableism and sexism in our community, however I have seen very little about eradicating anti-Semitism. From my perspective, the fact that the iconic witch is anti-Semitic should be reason enough to no longer utilize those items in any capacity, because to continue to ignore the anti-Semitic origins of the witch’s uniform would be the equivalent of continuing the oppression of a group of people.

However, there do seem to be certain groups of people who believe that Jews are somehow immune to things like oppression or bigotry. I would like to completely smash that idea to pieces, if possible, by reminding everyone who is reading this post that anti-Semitism is on the rise, and is a huge problem in multiple countries across the world. Anti-Semitism didn’t die with Hitler and the end of World War II. Anti-Semitism is not something of the past that no longer exists. It still exists in the here and now and is something we should be fighting to eradicate.

So, in other words, if something like this bothers you:

Then this should bother you, too:

Because both are perpetuating oppression of a group of people.

So how do we remedy this situation?

I think the first thing that we should do is to simply stop utilizing the stereotypical witch’s trope. Remember that it’s not ours to reclaim. Find other ways to express your witchiness, if that’s something you enjoy doing. Find other ways to express yourself and your practices that doesn’t rely on imagery that has been used to oppress people. Stopping the usage of pointy hats and crooked noses probably doesn’t seem like much, but its the small things that add up to larger things in the long run. And no longer utilizing these symbols is an easy step that we can all take.

From there, look into other ways to support the Jewish community. Raise awareness about anti-Semitism that occurs in our community, and remember not to speak for Jews, but instead to help their voices be heard. Remember that this isn’t about us as witches, but about Jewish people who have been experiencing oppression for centuries now.

If anyone has any other links relevant to this topic, please let me know so I can add them below.

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Posted by on September 24, 2014 in Rambles, Uncategorized

 

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Devo Magix: Impaling Magix

This technique is a byproduct of my work with Osiris last fall. As I was preparing for the Mysteries, Osiris showed me a way to help people heal through stabbing them. However, I can’t run around stabbing people here in the physical, so I created this method as an alternative for physical workings. The concept behind this practice is that you are essentially pinning down a person, problem or situation so that it can’t run away. You are forcing the issue and forcing those involved to handle the situation and fix it. Usually, fixing it will result in healing- at least in the Unseen. Results on the physical side can vary and I don’t recommend trying this technique unless you’re willing and ready to face potentially hard choices and have potentially unforeseen results (as can be the case with any magix). This method of magix is not recommended if you want a smooth and easy ride.

Supplies:

For this magix you will need a few supplies:

  • A container such as a bowl or dish
  • Paper
  • Writing instruments
  • Something you can pour into the dish such as sand, rice, flour or salt
  • A stabbing implement such as a needle, knife, fork, chopstick, etc.

 The Method:

As stated above, the basic idea here is that you’re going to be taking something that you want to change- a situation, a problem, whatever, and pinning it down so that it can be addressed. You can do this in a lot of different ways, but I’m going to be discussing the most basic method that I have employed over the past few months to start off with. As with any magix, feel free to experiment with your own ideas and try new things!

The first step (after you decide what you’re going to be fixing) is to get three pieces of paper that will fit inside of your dish. The dish I used in this example is a small circular dish, so I cut my pieces into circles. Essentially, the top and bottom sheets of paper will be marked with sigils that direct energy into the middle sheet of paper which is where you will write what you want to “pin down” to be changed.

003

In this situation, the middle sheet of paper was related to my workplace, so I stated that I wanted the workplace to improve. Both sheets of paper have directional arrows on them to push energy into the middle paper, into the petition. As you can see in the photo above, you will be stabbing these pages in this order. Make sure whatever paper you use, that your stabbing implement can actually pierce all of the sheets.

And this is where it gets tricky!

You’ll want to slowly pour your sand, rice, flour, salt, etc. into the dish that you’ll be using. I recommend pouring a fair amount in before you stick your impaled papers into the bowl, that way they will stand up properly. If you put the impaled papers in too quickly, they’ll fall over, or possibly slide off of the impaling implement. After some finagling, mine looked like this:

004

You can technically do this method without a dish, if you prefer (images at the bottom), but I like to use the dish as a means of stabilizing out what is going on. For this particular spell, I wanted something to keep things clean and (hopefully) calm. So I went with a lot of salt and a little bit of sand. In another version of this spell that I did, I went with rice and natron because I felt it would be calming and soothing for the situation. Use your judgement with what you think will work best.

005

I then placed some local plants onto the sand before I covered them up entirely. I did this in an effort to get local land spirits to help my cause, since it would be to their benefit if I were able to keep a steady and stable job.

006

And lastly, I tied some red thread through the eye of the needle as a means of doing some knot magix. I wanted the red to be eye catching as well as help with funneling more energy into my cause. I also added a piece of paper into the end of the needle that further explained my petition to any entities that wished to help. The whole notion is that everything is funneling and propelling energy down the needle and into the situation at the base of the needle. The whole point is to drive everything and everyone to work on the issue so that it can be resolved.

But does it work?

My answer is: I think so! I wanted to test this spell out before I made it live. I made this original container at the end of last year in hopes of making my job situation better. At first, I wasn’t sure that it was working. However, by the end of December, I could definitely see changes that were starting to roll through my office. As of writing this post at the beginning of April, we’ve had at least one major shift in the personnel in our office, and I still have the bowl sitting outside doing its job. So for all I know, more changes will come in the future.

photo

As you can see, the paper that sat on top of the needle blew away in a winter storm and the needle has sorta fallen over. However, I do believe the petition was heard and that things did get moving because of this. However, it was not a smooth ride, and I did have a lot of times where I questioned what I should do and whether I had taken the right course of action. This seems to be one of the downsides to using this method- the results aren’t always what you expect them to be, and the results getting there are not always easy.

Another example of this type of magix is this piece here, which I made for a friend who was heavily injured:

This particular dish was made to be like an imiut fetish. Many imiut have a lily at the end, and I wanted to emphasize healing and growth, so I chose a lily (typically called a lotus) for growth and a Sa for protection during the transformation. Unfortunately, this one did not seem to work and my friend lost his battle against his injuries, may he travel safely to the West.

For my last example, I wanted to show how this may work without a needle or a dish. As stated above, you can use virtually anything that can stab or impale the sheets of paper. You also don’t necessarily need a dish to contain the papers- it just depends on what type of method and result you’re aiming for.

binding fork

For this spell I chose to use a fork. That is because the sentiment behind this working was “I hope you eat your words” and the fork seemed fitting for that. Like the other spells, the intent and petition is written on the paper which I pierced through. I then wrapped red and black cording around the rest of the fork as a means to bind the person to the words that they had spoken and to prevent them from saying anything else. So again, there are many applications and methods that you can use.

Impaling magix can be used to heal, to transform, or to curse. If you try any of the methods above, please let me know how they work out for you!

 

Other Devo Magix Posts:

 
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Posted by on April 22, 2014 in Devo Magix Series

 

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Devo Magix: Car Magix

I spend a lot of time in the car. And I mean a lot. In fact, most of us probably do- it seems you can’t live these days without a car. But despite the fact that many of us spend an hour (or more) per day in our vehicles, there is little to no tutorials out there on car magix. I’ve decided that I’d list a few of the things I do regularly to my car and hopefully you’ll be able to take some of these ideas and apply them to your own!

Protective Items and Amulets

One of the easiest things to do is to create a protective item for your car (or purchase one, such as a driving omamori). These items can be stashed in a variety of places in your car such as:

  • Glove box
  • Car remote/garage remote
  • Under your visor
  • Key ring
  • Console (usually btwn the seats)
  • Trunk/spare tire pit
  • Undercarriage of your car (be careful what you put down there!)
  • Underside of your hood
  • Rear view mirror
  • The pouches on the back of your front seats
  • Underneath the front seats

These items can be in just about any form. They can be sigils scrawled on paper, or on the backs of keychains, hub caps, and car jars. They can be enchanted pennies and other change that lives in your cup holder. You could charge your bottle of emergency water that you keep in the trunk to help keep you safe. You could easily take any stone or other talisman that calls to you, charge it up for protection, and place it in a location that works well for you. It doesn’t have to be fancy or flashy to get the job done. Remember that sometimes the best magix hides in plain sight.

Using the Exterior of Your Car

One of the methods I like to use for protecting my car is through drawing sigils on the exterior. I often will physically draw sigils in the dust on my car (or you could use some type of writing utensil that is suitable for the exterior.. or just draw with your finger). Once I’ve got the sigils plastered all over it, I will wash the dust away. The sigils remain in tact, though invisible to the naked eye, and the car has been cleansed- removing any bad stuff from it.

You can also anoint your car with oils or special waters to help cleanse, consecrate or protect it. You could even do the sigil work above (with your fingers, or with an oil/water), cleanse the car, and then anoint with oils or special water.

And for some slightly more crack induced ideas:

One of the more obscure things that I do is magix while driving. I don’t really know how it started or why I started doing it, but one day I noticed that I saw another me standing on the roof of the car. This part of me would do random things while I would drive, and eventually it began to be something I’d slightly do consciously. Many times, this version of me will do magix stuff while I am driving if the need arises.

If I suddenly see a cop, or I am worrying about getting pulled over, ‘magix me’ will often throw a ‘sheet’ over my car. In this case, it’s black, to match the car and pavement color. This sheet is essentially an invisibility cloak. As the sheet settles over my vehicle, I visualize my car becoming invisible- blending into the road and traffic.

Another thing I have done is while driving on slippery roads, I will visualize yellow/gold energy (I don’t know why) around each of my tires that can lead up to my hands/arms. This energy is geared to help grip the road. To keep my car steady, and to help me brake faster if needed.

I have no clue if anyone else does anything like this, but I’m placing them here for consideration all the same.

More mundane solutions:

I feel like a post on car magix and car protections wouldn’t be complete without a section on mundane stuff. For those of us who spend a lot of time on the road, I think its important that you consider having some essentials in your car as well. These items could be magixed in their own right, if you wanted:

  • Things that keep your car running well such as jumper cables and tire gauges
  • Things that keep you safe when your car breaks down such as blankets, emergency water and food and reflectors
  • Things that help keep you alive in emergency situations such as fire starters, window breaking tools and multi-tool knives

As with all things regarding cars, I advise you to keep your car in good working order, as magix will only take you so far. Please be sure to drive safely and responsibly.

 

 
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Posted by on April 13, 2014 in Devo Magix Series

 

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Modern Mythology: I <3 Balls Day

Gather around the camp fire once again as we delve into the myths and stories of our religion!

Set

During the ongoing battle for the Kingship of Egypt, Set and Horus found themselves in a large predicament. You see, each deity had been damaged from this battle – one losing his eye, and the other his testicles. It’s very painful to lose your testicles, you know! Through a series of wiley tricks and maneuvers, however, both were able to get their missing pieces restored to their former glory.

What Set didn’t know at the time, however, is that Thoth – “Astute in His Plans Who Fashioned All Things, Including Set’s Nuts” – gave him an even better set of balls as a way of saying thank you for taking the bad rap for the whole “felling Osiris” thing. When Set received his new shiny set of testicles, he was amazed at their awesomeness. It was like having a disco in his pants.

He was so ecstatic about his new hardware that Set ran to the highest point of Egypt and yelled out across the land “These are the best balls ever! Look at how amazing they are! I will surely be able to use them to smite apep every day!” Everyone was so happy for his new shiny testicles that a festival was proclaimed in their honor. And in our modern calendar, that day is February 14th- the day of <3-ing Your Balls.

You can see the effects of this festival almost everywhere you look! There are stands of balls in grocery stores. Ball shaped candies and candy containers. Ball shaped jewelry. Ball shaped everything! All as glorious and magnificent as Set’s newborn testicles.

When celebrating this holiday, it is customary to deck out your shrine is as many ball-shaped items as possible. Set loves the color red, so the redder, the better. However, he does has a soft side and can appreciate balls of other colors. Be sure to spend some time reflecting on your own personal badassery and taking the time to remember just how great you really are. You can also use this time to ask Set and Thoth in assistance in making your own balls better- as a means of seizing your potential and making tough choices that require balls to make!

With the proper heka, Thoth can assist you in creating a disco in your pants, too!

___________________

Every year around February we see nearly every grocery store in America fill up with tons of pink and red Valentine’s Day stuff. Usually, this is a holiday I don’t participate in at all. I’ve never cared for the concept behind it, and I’ve just never really gotten into the habit of doing anything for V-Day.

However, my foray into Kemeticism has changed my perspective on this holiday. Set’s main symbol is his balls. For most of us, we take a standard heart and turn it upside down to make it into a set of balls (which may not be too far off of what the heart used to mean). So now the second half of January and the first half of February is nothing but balls for me. It’s turned from a holiday about romance into a holiday about Set.

And his balls.

I feel like this can be shifted into a modern festival or rite that we can use within our community for seizing the day, taking hold of our courage and reminding ourselves of our greatness (in the same way that Set reminds me of his greatness all the time). If you’d like to give it a shot, there are two methods for this particular heka. One version, which involves a large chocolate heart, can be found here. The second, which involves good old fashions paper, is below:

  • Sheet of paper- 8.5″x11″. Any color will do, I recommend red or purple.
  • Writing utensils of whatever color you’d like.
  • A situation or trait you need to find some courage to tackle.
  • This tutorial about folding.

Start with your paper- figure out what situation you need some courage with. On the inside of your paper, write the situation down. You can be as specific or generalized as you need to be. Feel free to use sigils or different colors for different things. Get as creative as you want.

Then, fold up your paper into the shape of the balls using the tutorial above. If possible, place your balls in a location where you can see them regularly. If your situation is at work, perhaps leave them on your desk. If it is something to do with money, maybe leave it in your wallet. If you’re unsure, leave them on your shrine for the gods to keep an eye on.

Hopefully the heka provided in this post can help you to gain some courage and celebrate your awesomeness this Valentine’s Day! If you have any questions regarding these rites, or try these rites out for yourself- please let me know!

Other Modern Mythology Posts:

 
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Posted by on January 21, 2014 in Kemeticism, Rambles

 

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